Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

18 Sept. 2017

Although already more then 3 years past this tragic incident, the below video  of the Dutch Safety Board clearly explains, what happened.

The crash of flight MH17 on 17 July 2014 was caused by the detonation of a 9N314M-type warhead launched from the eastern part of Ukraine using a Buk missile system. So says the investigation report published by the Dutch Safety Board

Watch the video and pictures below:

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

Video: Cause of MH17 crash by Dutch Safety Board

From Wikipedia:

Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 (MH17/MAS17) was a scheduled passenger flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur that was shot down on 17 July 2014 while flying over eastern Ukraine, killing all 283 passengers and 15 crew on board. Contact with the aircraft, a Boeing 777-200ER, was lost about 50 km (31 mi) from the Ukraine–Russia border and wreckage of the aircraft landed near Torez in Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine, 40 km (25 mi) from the border. The crash occurred in an area controlled by the Donbass People's Militia during the Battle in Shakhtarsk Raion, part of the ongoing war in Donbass. The crash is the deadliest airliner shootdown, eighth-deadliest aviation disaster, and was Malaysia Airlines' second aircraft loss during 2014 after the disappearance of Flight 370 on March 8.

In October 2015, the Dutch Safety Board (DSB) concluded that the airliner was downed by a Buk surface-to-air missile (NATO reporting name: SA-11 Gadfly) launched from pro-Russian separatist-controlled territory in Ukraine. In September 2016, the Dutch-led Joint Investigation Team (JIT) confirmed the missile type which had downed the aircraft and said that the Buk missile system had been transported from Russia on the day of the crash, fired from a field in a rebel controlled area and returned to Russia after the Buk was used to shoot down MH17. The JIT had established the identities of approximately 100 people, witnesses or suspects, who were linked to the transporting of the Buk, but said that their evidence "must stand before a court".

The DSB and JIT findings confirmed earlier claims by American and German intelligence sources and the Ukrainian government as to the missile type and launch area. In 2014, Ukraine and US intelligence had also said that Russia had supplied the Buk missile to pro-Russian insurgents, who had mistakenly shot down the aircraft. Also in 2014, German intelligencesources reported that they believed insurgents had stolen the missile from the Ukrainian military.

Russian government sources initially claimed that the aircraft was being followed by a Ukrainian military jet at the time of the shootdown and later that Ukraine was responsible since the crash had happened in Ukrainian airspace. Several theories about the crash have since appeared in Russian media, and as of September 2016, the Russian government continues to deny responsibility for the crash.

Immediately after the crash, a post appeared on the VKontakte social media profile attributed to Russian Colonel Igor Girkin, leader of the Donbass separatist militia, claiming responsibility for shooting down an AN-26 near Torez, but later the same day the separatists denied involvement and the post was removed. In late July 2014, communications intercepts were made public in which, it is claimed, separatists are heard discussing an aircraft that they had downed and later, their realisation that it was a civilian aircraft.

Between November 2014 and May 2016, UK-based investigative collective Bellingcat made a series of conclusions, based on their examination of photos in social media and other open-source information. Bellingcat said that the launcher used to shoot down the aircraft was Buk 332 of the Russian 53rd Anti-Aircraft Rocket Brigade based in Kursk, Russia, which had been transported from Donetsk to Snizhne and was controlled by separatists in Ukraine on the day of the attack.

In July 2015, Malaysia proposed that the United Nations Security Council set up an international tribunal to prosecute those deemed responsible for the downing of the plane. The Malaysian resolution gained a majority on the Security Council, but was vetoed by Russia.  SOURCE: Wikipedia


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